Split Decision on Arbitration in Bank of America Case

This week, a Florida appeals court partially reversed a ruling denying Bank of America’s efforts to arbitrate various claims related to the Scott Rothstein Ponzi scheme. Bank of America, N.A. v. Beverly, Nos. 4D14-3167, 4D14-3168 (Fla. Dist. Ct. App. June 10, 2015). The appellate court ordered arbitration in a case brought by Douglas Von Allmen, a long-time customer of Bank of America, who alleged that the bank’s improper advice led him to invest in a feeder fund to the Rothstein Ponzi scheme. Von Allmen had entered into a loan agreement with the bank that had a broad arbitration clause, which the court found to be enforceable.

In a second case consolidated for purposes of appeal, the Florida court refused to order arbitration in a case against Bank of America brought by plaintiffs who had no relationship to Bank of America, but who alleged that the bank’s advice to Von Allmen propped up Rothstein’s Ponzi scheme. The court found that these plaintiffs, who were non-signatories to any agreement with Bank of America, could not be forced into arbitration.

For a potential plaintiff, knowing whether your dispute arises from an agreement and whether that agreement has an enforceable arbitration clause can save not only time but also legal costs.

Rich Intelisano and Katz LLP represents investors in arbitrations and other litigations against broker-dealers and other financial firms.